District Profile

The Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) was formed in 1936 pursuant to County Water District Law, found in the California Water Code, Division 12, beginning with Section 30000. CCWD serves a population of about 500,000 people in central and east Contra Costa County.

About 250,000 people receive treated water directly from CCWD, and the other 250,000 receive water the Water District delivers to six local agencies. CCWD draws its water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta under a contract with the federal Central Valley Project (CVP), and as such is particularly concerned about Delta water quality and the Delta environment. CCWD is the CVP's largest urban contractor.
In 1998, the water district completed construction of the locally-financed $450 million Los Vaqueros Project, including a 100,000 acre-foot reservoir, designed to provide improved water quality and emergency supply reliability for CCWD customers as well as net environmental benefits.

In 2012, the reservoir was enlarged. The dam was raised 34-feet and the reservoir's capacity was increased to 160,000 acre-feet.

Service Area


  • Service area: Central and Eastern Contra Costa County, California
  • Map

Water Revenues (2015)


  • Municipal - 21.6%
  • Residential - 47.4%
  • Commercial - 9.0%
  • Industrial - 16.1%
  • Public Facilities and Other - 5.9%

Miscellaneous Statistics


  • Total Area Of District: 137,127 acres
  • Number Of Employees: 303.5 (full-time equivalents)
  • Capital Assets : $1,246,326,190

Major Customers


Treated Water (treated and distributed by CCWD): The following communities receive wholesale treated water from CCWD:

Industrial


  • Tesoro Refining and Marketing
  • Shell Oil
  • Foster Wheeler
  • Rhodia
  • Dow Chemical Company
  • Calpine
  • USS-POSCO
  • ECO Services
  • Eight other smaller industries and businesses

Agricultural


  • 26 customers

Contra Costa Canal


Part of the Central Valley Project, the Contra Costa Canal is the backbone of the Contra Costa Water District, delivering water from the Delta to the District's treatment facilities and raw-water customers. The canal is a 48-mile long facility that starts at Rock Slough in East Contra Costa County and ends at the Terminal Reservoir in Martinez. Along the way, it winds through Oakley, Antioch, Pittsburg, Bay Point, Clyde, Pacheco, Concord, Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hill. Water is drawn from Rock Slough near Knightsen (8 miles east of Antioch) and Old River near Discovery Bay. Rock Slough water travels through a 4-mile unlined channel before entering the concrete-lined section of the canal in Oakley. Old River water is delivered by pipeline either to the Los Vaqueros Reservoir or to the Contra Costa Canal in Antioch.

Los Vaqueros Conveyance System


Several large diameter buried pipelines transport water from the Middle River and Old River intakes to a Transfer Station outside of Brentwood, where water is then pumped south to the Los Vaqueros Reservoir or travels north to the Contra Costa Canal by gravity.

Reservoirs (Storage Capacity)


  • Martinez Reservoir: 270 acre-feet
  • Contra Loma Reservoir: 2,500 acre-feet
  • Mallard Reservoir: 3,000 acre-feet
  • Los Vaqueros Reservoir: 160,000 acre-feet

Treated Water Distribution Facilities


  • Pipelines: 888 miles
  • Storage Reservoirs: 41
  • Pump Stations: 31
  • Connections: 61,085

Treatment


  • Ralph D. Bollman Water Treatment Plant (PDF), Concord, California: Conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation); dual media GAC (granular activated carbon) filtration; intermediate ozonation and post ozonation.
    • Plant Capacity: 75 million gallons per day
  • Randall-Bold Water Treatment Plant (PDF), Oakley, California: Conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation); dual media GAC (granular activated carbon) filtration; intermediate and post ozonation.
    • Plant Capacity: 50 million gallons per day (The plant is jointly owned with the Diablo Water District)
  • CCWD/City of Brentwood Treatment Plant Oakley, California: Conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation); dual media GAC (granular activated carbon) filtration; intermediate and post ozonation.
    • Plant Capacity: 16.5 million gallons a day.
For more information, see the Annual Report.